Research Week 2019 is a multidisciplinary annual event sponsored by the Graduate School, the Center for Research and Scholarship, and the Jerry Falwell Library. This event is designed to highlight excellent research and scholarship produced by Liberty University students.

Research Week 2019 Results

Research Week 2019 Program and Full Schedule

Review of Research Week 2019

Participants: Over 270 initial applications
  • 225 final presentations (95 oral, 75 posters, 38 Juried Art, 15 Three Minute Thesis, and 2 performing arts)
  • 15 schools and colleges represented and 105 programs of study
  • 61 presentations from the School of Health Sciences - most represented school or college
  • 54 presentations from the College of Arts & Sciences - second most represented school or college
  • 27 presentations from the B.S. in Biomedical Sciences - most represented program of study

    Award Winners: presentations were judged by 32 volunteer faculty judges.
  • 24 first place honors: 15 undergraduate and 9 Graduate
  • 21 second place honors: 15 Undergraduate and 8 Graduate
  • 15 third place honors: 10 Undergraduate and 4 Graduate
  • 14 Liberty Online students won awards

    Submission Information

    Submissions will be accepted from both residential and online students (Graduate or Undergraduate) with the approval of faculty sponsor (required). The approval process for your self-selected faculty sponsor is imbedded in the submission portal which will be available here when the call for submissions opens. Students must submit an abstract using the abstract template through the Research Week submission portal for the following presentation types. Researchers may compete in physical poster, oral, and/or performing arts presentations as detailed here:

    • A Physical Poster Presentation (Residential or Online Students)

      Print poster presentations must conform to these guidelines for graduate and undergraduates students . Please follow the templates provided. Please choose landscape orientation or portrait orientation. templates. Students must be physically present to compete. Please be prepared to select one of the following five research subtypes when submitting your proposals: Basic, Applied, Textual or Investigative, or Creative and Artistic (descriptions below).

    • An Oral Presentation or Creative Work Presentation (Residential Students)

      PowerPoint presentations must be created following these guidelines and using any of the 16x9 PowerPoint background slides. Presentations should be limited to 15 minutes with an additional 5 minutes for questions and answers. Please be prepared to select one of the following five research subtypes when submitting your proposals: Basic, Applied, Textual or Investigative, or Creative and Artistic (descriptions below).

    • A Remote Oral Presentation (Online Students)

      Remote presenters must have access to these technological requirements . PowerPoint presentations must be created following these guidelines and using any of the 16x9 PowerPoint background slides. Presentations should be limited to 15 minutes with an additional 5 minutes for questions and answers. Please be prepared to select one of the following five research subtypes when submitting your proposals: Basic, Applied, Textual or Investigative, or Creative and Artistic (descriptions below).

    • Juried Art Exhibition (Residential Students SADA or Online Undergraduate SADA Students)

      All submissions must be original artwork (2-D, 3-D, Graphic Design) produced by the student. All juried artwork must follow the Juried Art Exhibition guidelines. Awards will be given for first place, second place, third place, and judge's choice. All presentations will be judged based on the Juried Art Exhibition Rubric. All presentations must follow these guidelines. All presentations will be judged based on the Juried Arts Rubric.

    • Performing Arts Presentation (Residential Students)

      A music performance, theatre performance, or film. The music performance may be an existing composition or a new composition. The theatre performance may be based on an existing script or a new script. The film must be a new original film. The performance or film may be up to 15 minutes in length, with 5 additional minutes for questions. All presentations must follow these guidelines. All presentations will be judged based on the Performing Arts Rubric.

    • Three Minute Thesis Competition (Residential Students)

      An 80,000 word Ph.D. thesis would take 9 hours to present. Your time limit... 3 minutes. The Three Minute Thesis (3MT® ) is an academic research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ), Australia. This will be an opportunity for doctoral and master’s level students to concisely summarize and clearly communicate a well-conceived thesis/dissertation project, compelling data collected, and a novel story to share. The ability to do this in three minutes or less allows the student to develop academic, presentation and research communication skills. The rules and judging criteria that the judges will be using can be found here. Students must be near to or already completing a thesis or dissertation. They must also be physically present to compete.

      Submissions will be accepted for oral and poster presentations based on the following five research subtypes (descriptions provided), and will be judged based on corresponding rubrics.

      1) Basic Rubric
      Research in this area seeks to identify and develop a fundamental research question regarding the nature of one’s field of study (e.g., human behavior or genetic manipulations of E coli). These studies successfully experiment with one or more manipulated variables, then analyze the collected information to answer the research question. Typically, these studies will employ the experimental method and are often conducted in a controlled, laboratory environment.

      2) Applied Rubric
      Applied research studies aim to better understand or solve real world problems. They employ quantitative, qualitative, or mixed research designs to answer a research question. These studies often utilize quasi-experimental, correlational, qualitative, or case study research designs and will lead to implications for practical application.

      3) Theoretical Proposal Rubric
      Theoretical research provides a synthesis of guiding theories and extant empirical literature, artifacts, or other evidence to develop new frameworks for future research. Theoretical proposals may include basic, applied, textual or investigative, creative and artistic research. Research has not been conducted in this category, but suggestions for future areas of research should be included.

      4) Textual or Investigative Rubric
      Research that investigates texts, artifacts, and documents without changing any variables. Typically this research critically engages texts, artifacts, or documents to prove a thesis, association, pattern, relationship, or previously unobserved significance. Sample fields may include History, Philosophy, English, Biblical Studies, Humanities, Theology, Journalism, Law, and Government.

      5) Creative and Artistic Rubric
      Research that discovers and critically evaluates source material in an artistic project for a public audience. Researchers typically work systematically to create new forms of articulation and expression. Sample fields may include Digital Arts, Worship, Music, Cinematic Arts, FACS, Theater, and Communications.

  • Browse the contents of 2019:

    Three-Minute Thesis Competition
    Poster Presentations
    Performing Arts Presentations
    Oral Presentations
    Juried Arts