Department

School of Education

Degree

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Chair

Rita C. Schellenberg

Primary Subject Area

Education, Educational Psychology; Education, Elementary; Education, General; Education, Guidance and Counseling; Psychology, General

Keywords

Burnout, Counselor-to-student ratio, Elementary School counselors, School Counselors, Self-efficacy, Title I school

Disciplines

Counseling Psychology | Education | Educational Psychology | Elementary Education and Teaching | Psychology | Student Counseling and Personnel Services

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between elementary school counselors' self-efficacy, counselor-to-student ratio, and employment in a Title I school and burnout on the dimensions of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. This study also investigated which factor(s) (i.e., self-efficacy, counselor-to-student ratio, or employment in a Title I school) predicts burnout on the dimensions of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment among elementary school counselors. Data collected from 84 elementary school counselors were used to test four hypotheses. A significant positive relation was found between elementary school counselors' self-efficacy and personal accomplishment. Emotional exhaustion and depersonalization were not related to elementary school counselors' self-efficacy. The correlations for counselor-to-student ratio with emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment were not significant. The correlations for counselors employed in a Title I school with emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment were not significant. Elementary school counselors' self-efficacy, counselor-to-student ratio, nor employment in a Title I school predicted burnout on the dimensions of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Elementary school counselors' self-efficacy and counselor-to-student ratio were predictors of burnout on the dimension of personal accomplishment, with self-efficacy being the strongest predictor.