Date

4-2017

Department

School of Education

Degree

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Chair

James A Fyock

Keywords

Bible, Christian International Schools, High School, Student Perceptions, Teaching Methods

Disciplines

Curriculum and Instruction | Education | Educational Assessment, Evaluation, and Research | Educational Methods | Other Education

Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative case study was to investigate the perceptions of the impact of a Bible curriculum and the teachers’ instructional delivery of that Bible curriculum on grade 12 international school students at an open enrollment Christian international school in Asia. The theories that guided this study were Kohlberg’s moral development, Fowler’s faith development, and Piaget’s cognitive development theories (Fowler, 1991, 2001; Kohlberg & Hersh, 1977; Piaget, 1972). The study’s central question is: How does the perception of both the content of a Bible curriculum and the teachers’ instructional delivery of that Bible curriculum affect students at an open enrollment Christian international school in Asia? The participants were six grade 12 students currently enrolled at a Christian international school within Asia. Data were collected using individual interviews, weekly journal responses, and focus group interviews. Analysis of data used Yin’s (2015) five phases of qualitative analysis and Saldaña’s (2015) first cycle coding, in vivio and intial codes, followed by second cycle coding, pattern codes, that emerged into five common themes. These themes were (a) authentic learning, (b) interdisciplinary connections, (c) personal ownership, (d) teacher presence, and (e) tolerance. The findings revealed that a teacher’s demeanor and delivery methods impacted student perceptions of the Bible class, rather than the content. Students engaged in authentic and active learning perceived a deeper understanding and learning of the content. When a connection between the Bible content and other subject areas was made, students perceived an impact on their faith and worldview development. Lastly, when tolerance was exhibited, it gave students the sense of safety to share and discuss their opinions, which further enhanced their understanding of the Bible.