Author(s)

Kira WilsonFollow

Date

5-2016

Department

School of Education

Degree

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Chair

Paul Tapper, Fred Milacci

Keywords

Academic Success, Achievement Motivation, Family Culture, Parental Involvement, Parent-child Interaction, Parenting Practices

Disciplines

Education | Educational Assessment, Evaluation, and Research | Educational Psychology | Higher Education | Other Education

Abstract

The purpose of this phenomenological study is to describe the parenting practices experienced by graduates of masters and doctoral programs identified as having fostered their academic success. The research explores the following questions: How do graduates of masters and doctoral programs describe the parenting practices of their parents that they perceive to have fostered academic success; in what ways did participants’ parents’ parenting practices motivate graduates of masters and doctoral programs that fostered their academic success; how do graduates of masters and doctoral programs describe the parent-child communication they perceive to have fostered academic success; and which parenting practice or attitude of their parents do graduates of masters and doctoral programs describe as contributing most to fostering their academic success? A snowball sampling of twelve, 24-31 year old graduates of masters and doctoral programs were interviewed and participated in a focus group to describe the parenting practices they perceived to have fostered their academic success. Data was analyzed for significant statements and coded to identify recurring themes. The guiding theories for this study were Vygotsky’s (1978) sociocultural learning theory, Bandura’s (1977) observational learning theory, and the biblical model of parenting. Findings support these theories and confirm existing studies on parental involvement and achievement. Parent practices, parent motivators, parent-child interaction, and parent values were themes that emerged from the data, revealing the significance of reading, faith, parent-child interaction, and the parents’ view of education. Recommendations for future research include replicating this study with a more diverse group of participants and examining the role faith plays in family culture.