Date

6-1984

Document Type

Article

Department

Seminary

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Primary Subject Area

Psychology, Developmental; Religion, Clergy

Abstract

This study was designed to assess the contributions and differential abilities of two types of self-monitoring interventions (academic and behavioral) in securing immediate and sustained (generalizable) increases in academic productivity. Fifteen second grade children participated in a study in which the experimental groups were required to either monitor on-task behavior or the component skills of a cursive writing task. While academic increases were demonstrated by both of the experimental groups during treatment, the study clearly demonstrated that academic self-monitoring was superior to behavioral self-monitoring in producing immediate and sustained academic results without the aid of reinforcement.

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