Event Title

The Geneva Bible and the Popularization of the Puritan Apocalyptical Hermeneutic

Location

Room A

Start Date

1-10-2011 9:15 AM

End Date

1-10-2011 10:30 AM

Abstract

The Geneva Bible was translated into English at Geneva Switzerland by English Protestant exiles and published in 1560. It became an immediate favorite with the English public and served as a transition between the Great Bible and the King James Version. The translation committee, headed by William Whittingham, produced the most unique Bible of its time because of its numerous study notes, illustrated woodcuts, and strongly anti-Catholic bias.

The Geneva Bible served as a standard of the highest quality printing and practical scholarship in the sixteenth century. Each book of the Bible was preceded by an explanatory paragraph called “The Argument” of the book. The study notes included extensive cross references, pictorial charts and diagrams, explanations of translations, and theological notations, especially regarding matters of eschatology. It was these notations which inflamed the apocalyptic visions of the English people and eventually led to the English civil wars of the seventeenth century.

The English public viewed the Protestant Reformation as a cosmic conflict between the forces of Christ and those of antichrist. With the accession of King James I of England in 1603, the apocalyptic expectations of the English people reached even further heights. One cannot fully understand nor appreciate the religious, social and political context of the King James Version apart from the cultural setting which was so greatly influenced by the Geneva Bible.

Comments

Dr. Ed Hindson is Distinguished Professor of Religion at Liberty University. He is the President of the World Prophetic Ministry in Los Angeles, has published over 40 books on Bible Hermeneutics and more than 200 articles. He also was the editor of five study Bibles.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 1st, 9:15 AM Oct 1st, 10:30 AM

The Geneva Bible and the Popularization of the Puritan Apocalyptical Hermeneutic

Room A

The Geneva Bible was translated into English at Geneva Switzerland by English Protestant exiles and published in 1560. It became an immediate favorite with the English public and served as a transition between the Great Bible and the King James Version. The translation committee, headed by William Whittingham, produced the most unique Bible of its time because of its numerous study notes, illustrated woodcuts, and strongly anti-Catholic bias.

The Geneva Bible served as a standard of the highest quality printing and practical scholarship in the sixteenth century. Each book of the Bible was preceded by an explanatory paragraph called “The Argument” of the book. The study notes included extensive cross references, pictorial charts and diagrams, explanations of translations, and theological notations, especially regarding matters of eschatology. It was these notations which inflamed the apocalyptic visions of the English people and eventually led to the English civil wars of the seventeenth century.

The English public viewed the Protestant Reformation as a cosmic conflict between the forces of Christ and those of antichrist. With the accession of King James I of England in 1603, the apocalyptic expectations of the English people reached even further heights. One cannot fully understand nor appreciate the religious, social and political context of the King James Version apart from the cultural setting which was so greatly influenced by the Geneva Bible.