Date

6-1-2008

Document Type

Article

Department

Counseling Department

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Chair

Ron Hawkins

Primary Subject Area

Psychology, Clinical

Keywords

Fire, EMS, Traumatic Stress, Fire/EMS, Coping Methods

Disciplines

Clinical Psychology | Psychology | Social and Behavioral Sciences

Abstract

Firefighters and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) professionals must cope with a variety of job-related stressors. One significant stressor for fire/EMS providers involves exposure to personally disturbing incidents (PDIs). To manage the untoward effects of exposure to PDIs, fire/EMS professionals use a variety of coping methods. In this study, the effectiveness of various coping methods utilized by fire/EMS professionals for mitigating the negative effects of exposure to PDIs was examined. This study provides some clarity by identifying the subjective distress associated with certain PDIs and pinpointing detrimental coping methods of fire/EMS personnel through scores on the 28-item General Health Questionnaire and Ways of Coping Questionnaire. This study revealed five coping methods that were predictors for increasing traumatic stress symptomatology.

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