Author(s)

Jeff NoeFollow

Department

School of Education

Degree

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Chair

Deanna Keith

Primary Subject Area

Education, General; Education, Administration; Education, Educational Psychology; Education, Sociology of; Education, Secondary

Keywords

Emotional Intelligence, Instructional Leadership, Multiple Intelligence Theory, School Culture, SOL End-of-Course Test, Student Achievement

Disciplines

Education | Educational Assessment, Evaluation, and Research | Educational Psychology | Elementary and Middle and Secondary Education Administration

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between secondary school principal's emotional intelligence quotient, school culture, and student achievement. Partial correlation was conducted to examine the degree of relationships between principal's emotional intelligence quotient and school culture controlling for the effect of student achievement, and between principal's emotional intelligence quotient and student achievement controlling for school culture. Multiple regression analysis was utilized to examine the combined effect of principal's emotional intelligence quotient and school culture on student achievement. The study population consisted of secondary school principals and teachers within Virginia Department of Education's Region VII. Quantitative data were collected using two survey instruments and publicly available standardized test pass percentage data: Emotional Intelligence Appraisal (see Appendix A for sample questions) by TalentSmart (Bradberry & Greaves, 2010); the School Culture Survey (see Appendix B) developed by Gruenert (1998); and The Commonwealth of Virginia's Standards of Learning (SOL) test data. The results showed principal's emotional intelligence quotient was not significantly associated with school culture, and negatively associated with student achievement. Further, the combination of predictor variables principal's emotional intelligence quotient and school culture, did not significantly predict student achievement. Suggestions for further research are also included.

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