Author(s)

Yoonsu LeeFollow

Date

8-2017

Department

Rawlings School of Divinity

Degree

Doctor of Ministry (DMin)

Chair

Donald Quentin Hicks

Keywords

Counseling, Discipleship, Discipleship Curriculum, Mental Healty, Pastoral Counseling, South Korean Church

Disciplines

Christianity | Comparative Methodologies and Theories | Other Religion | Practical Theology | Religion | Religious Thought, Theology and Philosophy of Religion

Abstract

In South Korea, many churches create and run discipleship programs. The programs help many people to focus on Jesus, but the programs come with significant problem. . If a person is experiencing a mental problem like stress, depression, or addiction, that person has a much more difficult time focusing on Jesus Christ rather than the struggles in his or her own life. Most discipleship programs ignore these prevalent mental issues, but including mental care in the course is vital to develop true disciples. Pastoral counseling has various mental care methods that address the problems facing many of its participants. South Korean churches must commit to accepting pastoral counseling as a part of their discipleship programs. This thesis explains the biblical, theological, and historical basis behind the idea of both discipleship training and pastoral counsel, also discovering a shared goal for the two endeavors. Having a common goal provides a basis for the connection between the two programs. In addition, this thesis research provides a current study of both subjects, using a survey to examine the needs of South Korean Christians as they relate to training. Finally, this thesis will provide a curriculum, the Two Ways Discipleship Curriculum, which is connects discipleship training with pastoral counseling for South Korean churches.